Indy.Code()

I have been fortunate enough to be allowed to speak at Indy.Code() which really means I’m grateful to get the chance to listen to all the other speakers. If you live anywhere around the Midwest, or can travel to Indianapolis, I highly recommend you come and watch the talks. It’s going to be an amazing event with some unbelievably great speakers. A fun time will be had by all. (Unless you hate fun, then you probably won’t like it so much. For everyone else, it’ll be pretty great!)

https://indycode.amegala.com/

C# 7 Additions – Pattern Matching

C# 7 has started to introduce Pattern Matching. This is a concept found in functional programming, and although it isn’t fully implemented compared to F#, it is a step in that direction. Microsoft has announced they intend on expanding it in future releases.

Constant Patterns

The is keyword has been expanded to allow all constants on the right side of the operator instead of just a type. Previously, C#’s only valid syntax was similar to:

Now it is possible to compare a variable to anything which is a constant: null, a value, etc.

Behind the scenes, the is statement is converted to calling the Equals function in IL code. The following two functions produce roughly the same code (they call different overloads of the Equals function).

CheckIsNull

CheckEqualsNull

This can also be combined with other features allowing variable assignment through the is operator.

In Visual Studio Preview 4, the scoping rules surrounding variables assigned in this manner are more restrictive than in the final version. Right now, they can only be used within the scope of the conditional statement.

Switch Statements

The new pattern matching extensions have also extended and changed the use of case statements. Patterns can now be used in switch statements.

Like in previous versions, the default statement will always be evaluated last, but the location of the other case statements now matter.

In this example, case int n will never evaluate, because the statement above it will always be true. Fortunately, the C# compiler will evaluate this, determine that it can’t be reached and raise a compiler error.

The variables declared in patterns behave differently than others. Each variable in a pattern can have the same name without running into a collision with other statements. Just as before, in order to declare a variable of the same name inside the case statement, you must still explicitly enforce scope by adding braces ({}).

Pattern matching has a ways to go when compared to its functional language equivalent, but it is still a nice addition and will become more complete as the language evolves.

C# 7 Additions – Literals

A small, but nice chance in C# 7 is increased flexibility in literals. Previously, large numeric constants had no separator, and it was difficult to easily read a large number. For example, if you needed a constant for the number of stars in the observable universe (1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000), you’d have to do the following:

If you hadn’t caught the error, the constant is too short, and it’s difficult to tell looking at the numbers without a separator. In C# 7, it’s now possible to use the underscore (_) in between the numbers. So the previous example now becomes much easier to read, and it is easily recognizable the number is off.

The new version adds binary constants too. Instead of writing a constant in hex, or decimal, a constant can now be written like so:

C# 7 Additions – Throw Expressions

In previous versions, throwing exceptions had certain limitations where they could be used. Although not hampering, at times it caused additional work to validate and throw an exception, and C# 7 has removed much of the developer overhead for validation and execution.

Expressions

Previously to throw an exception in the middle of an expression there were really two options:

or

It is now possible to also throw an exception in the middle of an expression. Instead of checking for null, it is possible to throw as the second condition in the Null Coalescing Operator.

It is also possible in the Conditional Operator as well.

Expression Bodied Members

C# 6 added the ability to write a method with a single statement with a “fat arrow” (=>) and the statement. What used to be

can now be condensed to:

If you need a method stub, because you don’t know how to complete the method, and it was appropriate to use an Expression Bodied Member, you were left with two possibilities as throwing an expression wasn’t allowed by the compiler.

or

The first is error prone, because if program calls the method, there is no indication that it isn’t functioning properly. (Is null an expected return or an indicator of an error?) The second is better, but it is a little cumbersome that you must convert it to a standard function just to throw the exception. C# 7 solves this inconvenience and is now possible to throw exceptions in the Expression Bodied Member.

C# 7 Additions – ref Variables

C# 7 expands the use of the ref keyword. Along with its previous use, it can now be used in return statements, and local variables can store a reference to the object as well. At first glance, the question is “What is the real difference between returning a ref variable, and setting it through an out parameter?” Previously you could set a variable passed into a function with ref (or out) to a different value. In C# 7, you can return the reference of a property, variable etc. and store that in a local variable for later use.

The following is an examples showing its expanded use.

As expected, the PersonInformation object is passed into the GetName function which returns a reference to the string property Name. This is then passed into the MakeCapitalized function which capitalizes the name “jenny” (making it “Jenny”) in the original PersonInformation object. Compare this to the example here showing how the previous version of C# would not allow the modification of the original property in the same scenario.

Classes vs Structs

If the PersonInformation is changed to be a struct (value type) instead of a class (reference type), the following code won’t work without a slight modification, but it is still completely possible.

Structs are passed by value meaning that passing a struct into a method creates a copy of it. Returning a reference to the struct’s property would return a reference to the copied struct and would go out of scope as soon as the method completes. There would be no point, and it would cause errors pointing to properties to objects which didn’t exist.

Caveats

With these new features there are some restrictions to it. Consider this. A string can be treated as an array of characters. With the new functionality, it should be possible to pass back a reference to a character location in that string and update it, because you have the reference to the character location in the string.

Fortunately, this isn’t allowed. The compiler prevents from it being a valid option, because if this were possible, it would break the string’s immutability and cause havoc with C#’s ability to intern strings.
ref string not allowed.

The compiler is also smart enough to not allow references to variables which fall out of scope. The following is also not allowed:

After the method exits someNumber no longer exists, and when another part of the application tries to access it, it won’t be available. (You could say this might not be the case if it were a reference type like a string, but it still wouldn’t matter, because all the reference has is a location to where the object is, not the actual object itself. This causes 2 problems: One, currently there is no way to get the value from the reference. Two, the object isn’t rooted, so it could still be garbage collected at any point in time.)

The compiler is also smart enough to trace the variable use through the calling methods. This is also not allowed:

C# 7 Additions – Out Variables

C# 7 removes the need for out variables to be predeclared before passing them into a function.

It also now allows the use of the var keyword to declare the variable type, because the compiler will infer the type based on the declared parameter type. This is not allowed when the compiler can’t infer the type because of method overloading. It would be nice if the compiler would attempt to infer it’s type based on the use later on in the method similar to F#’s inferred types, but this isn’t slated to be in the current release.

compiler confused because of method overloading.

In Visual Studio 15 Preview 4, the out variable isn’t working exactly as it will in the final release. Wild cards will hopefully be added so extraneous variables don’t need to be declared.

The following code won’t work until the scope restrictions on out variables is updated. (They have said they intend on doing this before the release.)

In this example, the scope is limited to the method call where the strings are set. To get it work currently, variable scope must be extended and can be like so:

The conditional statement wraps the variables and they can now be used in the Console.WriteLine. This will be corrected in the final release and won’t be necessary.

C# 7 Additions – Deconstructors

C# has a new type of method, the Deconstructor. When a type implements this method type with the name of Deconstruct, multiple variables maybe directly assigned as a return type would.

The method must be named Deconstruct and have a return type of void. The parameters to be assigned all must be out parameters, and because they are out parameters with a return type of void, C# allows the Deconstruct method to be overloaded solely based on these parameters. This is how the new System.ValueTuple allows it’s properties to be assigned to separate variables without assigning each one individually.

Deconstruct also does not need to be directly attached to the class. C# allows the method to be implemented as an extension method as well.

At the moment it is uncertain if wildcards will be added allowing unneeded variables to be omitted from being assigned. This addition would allow the insertion of the * to indicate a parameter is not needed (similar to _ in F#)

C# 7 Additions – Local Functions

In C# 7 it is now possible to create a function within a function termed a Local Function. This is for instances where a second function is helpful, but it’s not really needed in the rest of the class. It’s created just like regular functions except in the middle of another function.

Just like normal functions, you can create expression bodied members as well

Local variables in the outer functions are accessible, and it’s possible to embed local functions inside other local functions:

So how does it work? Looking at the IL code, the compiler has converted the internal function into a private static one inside the class.

IL Code showing private static function

The name is generated at compile time, so it is not accessible to other methods, but it is still possible to access it through reflection with the private and static binding flags.

reflection shows local function.

Someone I know asked what would be a good use case of Local Functions vs. Lambdas. Lambdas can’t contain enumerators, and by encasing an enumerations in a local function it allows others parts of the outer method to be eagerly evaluated. For example, if you have a method which takes a parameter and returns an enumeration, the evaluation of the parameter won’t occur until program starts to enumerate the collection. Encapsulating the enumeration in a local function allows the other parts of the outer function to be eagerly evaluated. You can find an example of the difference between using one and not using one here.