C# 7 Additions – Pattern Matching

C# 7 has started to introduce Pattern Matching. This is a concept found in functional programming, and although it isn’t fully implemented compared to F#, it is a step in that direction. Microsoft has announced they intend on expanding it in future releases.

Constant Patterns

The is keyword has been expanded to allow all constants on the right side of the operator instead of just a type. Previously, C#’s only valid syntax was similar to:

Now it is possible to compare a variable to anything which is a constant: null, a value, etc.

Behind the scenes, the is statement is converted to calling the Equals function in IL code. The following two functions produce roughly the same code (they call different overloads of the Equals function).

CheckIsNull

CheckEqualsNull

This can also be combined with other features allowing variable assignment through the is operator.

In Visual Studio Preview 4, the scoping rules surrounding variables assigned in this manner are more restrictive than in the final version. Right now, they can only be used within the scope of the conditional statement.

Switch Statements

The new pattern matching extensions have also extended and changed the use of case statements. Patterns can now be used in switch statements.

Like in previous versions, the default statement will always be evaluated last, but the location of the other case statements now matter.

In this example, case int n will never evaluate, because the statement above it will always be true. Fortunately, the C# compiler will evaluate this, determine that it can’t be reached and raise a compiler error.

The variables declared in patterns behave differently than others. Each variable in a pattern can have the same name without running into a collision with other statements. Just as before, in order to declare a variable of the same name inside the case statement, you must still explicitly enforce scope by adding braces ({}).

Pattern matching has a ways to go when compared to its functional language equivalent, but it is still a nice addition and will become more complete as the language evolves.

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